John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Keep the Statue But...

    by LisaF, 8 months ago

    I believe the city created a missed opportunity of educating the greater public in taking down Sir John A. Macdonald's Statue. Keep the Statue , but put in a plaque describing the true history of not only this man but the government of it's time. We should learn from the past not try to erase it. My Story is this....I am Métis...and I'm of the older generation. Growing up, we were not taught of the atrocities John A. Macdonald and his govt did towards Métis and First Nations. Our parents and older generations didn't tell us much because they were... Continue reading

  • Moving Regina Forward

    by JamieMB , 8 months ago

    The voices that should be central in this discussion are the voices of Indigenous people most impacted by JAM’s genocidal policies. It doesn’t matter if there are other people who think he was good or not that bad. There are many people in this city who are very racist. Go check out the comments sections on news reports about this statue or Colton Boushie’s death. It is absolutely inappropriate for the city to be taking opinions from those people on this issue and considering them as equally worthy of consideration as that of Indigenous peoples. Removing the statue will absolutely... Continue reading

  • I Rather My Kids Learn Both Sides of the Story

    by TellUsAStory, 8 months ago
    There is the old saying...those that ignore history are doomed to repeat it. I certainly hope that NEVER occurs with what was done to First Nation peoples under Sir John A McDonald. However, I think there is a point for people to learn both sides of what that man did during his life. I really hope that after a new home is found for the statue we overhaul the plaque outlining both the positive things he did for this country and the negative. I don't think ignoring history and putting it out of site in storage will be good for... Continue reading
  • Agreed; get rid of the statue!

    by Richards, 8 months ago
    North Central has been a ghetto for decades, yet the city deems it necessary to create a "safe space" to promote this debate; a complete waste of money in my opinion.

    The removal of the statue is nothing unique or special. Such removals are happening in places that have progressed far enough to understand that colonial monuments are archaic and perpetuate incomplete historical narratives.

    Some small minds will likely drone on about history being stolen or otherwise disappearing as though the statue were a pillar of reality itself. To those who do; don't worry it's not. History isn't disappearing, but... Continue reading

  • Get rid of the statue!

    by SheilaM, 8 months ago
    John A McDonald was a colonialist,he did nothing to empower First Nation and Metis people. His policies we're racist and Indigenous people are still having to live with the legacy. Please get rid of this statue. Also, don't make the survey so difficult to participate in. I don't believe we would have to sign up for a City of Regina account to actually voice our opinions.
  • JAM has contributed to decades of bad relationships between First Peoples and settlers

    by Alliston, 8 months ago
    As a settler / settler descendant / Treaty person of white European ancestry I know we cannot live on this land in peace while the attempted genocide of First People's is memorialized in the figure of Canada's first prime minister. That statue has no place in a pubic park.
  • symbol of our values

    by GSAllen, 8 months ago
    Public art is a society's expression of its values and priorities, especially when commemmorating particular people or historic events. Sir John A. Macdonald was an important historical figure, but only one of many that could be honoured with a public statue. At a time when Canada was celebrating the centenary of its founding, it made some sense to honor JAM and his pivotal role in the development of this nation. That was then; this is now. Canadian values and ideals have shifted in the interm. We are trying to be more inclusive and no longer struggling as hard with the... Continue reading
  • Fear God and keep his commandments. This is the whole duty of mankind.

    by LBergen, 8 months ago

    **The Fool has said in his heart there is no God.

    Psalm 14: The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God. They are corrupt, they have done abominable works, there is none that doeth good.


    ** The Creator is the Ultimate Authority above the government. They must give account to God for how they do right or wrong by his people.

    Psalm 90:2 Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God.


    ** God said not to remove the ancient landmarks that... Continue reading

  • Stop Glorifying Genocide

    by Stoem, 8 months ago

    JAM was an architect of genocide. He oversaw the building of residential schools, and approved policies which lead directly to the kidnapping, abuse, and death of Indigenous children.

    He deliberately starved Indigenous people, leading to illness & death.

    He should not be celebrated, put on some pedestal, or glorified in any way.

    He should be spoken of with the same disgust as any mass murderer, any tyrant, anyone heading a government that deliberately & wilfully killed people.

    His name should be a curse, & we should spit on the ground when we hear it.

  • History Should Be Truthful

    by sstelmaschuk, 8 months ago

    While there is no doubt that Macdonald played his role in the Confederation of Canada and oversaw many developments in his role as our first Prime Minister, it is beyond harmful to attempt to only focus on the 'positives' of his role in history while trying to deny the harm that he had done at the same time.


    Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell, who himself stands as a controversial figure for his harsh policies towards the Irish during his reign, is often quoted that when he had his portrait done he wanted the painter to paint him 'warts and all'. Macdonald... Continue reading

Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30