John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • No John A, No Canada

    by Peter Rich, 8 days ago
    The Sir John A statue should be restored in a public location in the city. Signage should be updated about the good and bad of his legacy but as the founder of this country he deserves a statue in Regina.
  • Governments fail again!

    by MikeMahogany, 11 days ago

    In my opinion when the issue surfaced around the residential school graves near Kamloops BC, governments at all levels had an opportunity to contact First Nation and Métis leaders to humbly ask in a respectful way how to best address this situation that would be acceptable to the aboriginal peoples.

    They didn’t and now wonder why there’s been a huge black lash!

    Now they want to discuss things with them.


    I applaud the fact their making an effort to engage with aboriginal groups, but government continues to forget to do this before or at the time of the issue, despite... Continue reading

  • Let's embrace the educational opportunity

    by RJ, 20 days ago

    Without disrespecting the people who have suffered because of his policies; this statue, in the prominent Victoria Park location provides a great learning opportunity in a highly visible location that is visited by people of all cultures and all ages. We simply need to update the signage surrounding him. It should include the good and emphasize the bad. Let's re-tell the story to show us the whole truth. What a great opportunity and location for education!!

  • Disgusting

    by Proud Canadian , 23 days ago
    It’s absolutely disgusting that these events are taking place. We are removing great figures of Canadian history.


    God save the Queen

  • RECOGNIZE HISTORY FOR WHAT IT WAS

    by Larry, about 2 months ago
    Developing a Nation is a massive task. Although the leadership style of 100 years ago was not as acceptable as currently there must have been massive obstacles to developing this country. The initial centre of government was East of Winnipeg and they had their own issues and were not apparently as supportive of the challenges of developing the West. Movement and communication was light years away from current situations. One would think federal governing would be (or seen to be) almost perfect by the citizens today. Currently all kinds of issues and alienation are perceived by Westerners!

    Bottom line Mr... Continue reading

  • Stew Fettes

    by Stew Fettes, about 2 months ago
    Sir John A Macdonald statue should be placed on the Provincial Legislature grounds near the statue of Queen Elizabeth the current Royal Monarchy. Canada was totally under the control of the British Empire and Royal Monarchy when Sir John A. Macdonald was elected. This is a part of Canada's history good or bad, and must be preserved so that it never happens again.
  • No Sir John A., no Canada

    by Tommy Cranmer , about 2 months ago
    There would be no Canada without Sir John A. Macdonald. He nearly single-handedly brought this country together while bridging several major divides or chasms, such as linguistic, cultural and religious. Those were big problems back then and he helped the MPs from both sides come together and overcome their differences so this country could form. This is what reconciliation looks like.


    You should be ashamed for removing Sir John A.'s statue. Put him back in another prominent place so we can honour and thank him.



  • Let the truth be told................however shameful.........

    by Lord Redi, about 2 months ago

    True nation building requires us to learn the true history of Canada and all it's peoples. Failure to do this continues to perpetuate a fractured Canadian identity laced with hurt on one side and racism on the other - a weaker Canada in a dangerous world. Patriotism requires all of us to face the moments of shame and the moments of pride in our collective history as one people to build a strong country each one of us is ready to die for.............let's take action to heal the hurt and harm done to our brothers and sisters, learn the true... Continue reading

  • We don't need to idolize murderers

    by Solidarity forever, about 2 months ago
    No matter what good he did we have to come to terms with the extreme harm he brought to the indigenous population. He is directly responsible for acts of genocide enacted upon first nations. Theres no need for us to idolize a statue of him and be in denial of history. If it goes into a museum that's fine but not in public. Victoria Park is for EVERYONE, not just white people.
  • History belongs in museums and books but not in statues

    by VJV, about 2 months ago
    JA Macdonald statue was rightfully removed, and it should be placed in a museum for education purposes. A standalone statue does nothing but glorify an individual and doesn't present the complicated history behind them.


    Hitler did a lot of great for Germany too - but we'd be aghast to go to Germany today and see a statue of him smack in the middle of Berlin.

    Let's call a spade a spade and ensure the entire story behind our country's founding father is told - and that doesn't happen as a random statue in the middle of the city.