John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Take it down

    by H, 8 months ago

    Take it down

  • Statue Belongs In A Museum

    by LauraB, 8 months ago

    I fully support and applaud city council’s decision to remove the statue and use it as a tool to educate citizens about our past. It’s not acceptable to commemorate and memorialize a historical figure who actively sought to eliminate First Nations peoples. He certainly accomplished great things in other areas—no question. We need to understand both sides of this history, recognizing the achievements and the egregious harms that were carried out. Thanks to city council for your courage and for taking action after a very long wait for change!! Please do move forward with changing Dewdney as well.

  • Take them all down

    by TD, 8 months ago
    Just as well take down the Louis Riel statue, it is offensive to me to have statue honoring a rebel. While we are at it, no public buildings, streets or anything else named after anyone, white, black, first nation. To heck with trying to honor anyone, no one is perfect. Sound absurd? I agree, tell these social idiots to pound sand.
  • A statue does not change history.

    by Honest Citizen, 8 months ago
    I am for the statue being taken down. Yes, it is history. But history is in our books. A statue is meant to idolize someone and how can we idolize someone who has done wrong by our people? It is understandable that he has also done good but that does not excuse the bad. It is a statue that should be removed.
  • Destroying History, Communists first objective

    by Cody, 8 months ago
    Take a look at yourselves, social justice freaks. You are upheaving a system you didn't build for objectives you cannot define.

    This is a dangerous path for our children should you choose to make them tread it.


  • Sir John A. MacDonald

    by Concerned, 8 months ago

    Sir John A. MacDonald Statue

    It is remarkably easy for an individual to make decisions that are honest and in the best interest of the people. It is much tougher to make those same decisions as a member of a group. Sir John A. MacDonald was able to consolidate a group of people that led to the confederation of Canada under the British Empire. It acknowledged the relationship between the provinces and the federal government. He recognized the importance of a railroad from east to west that would ensure an expanding, evolving and strong Canada.

    Sir John A. MacDonald and... Continue reading

  • Bring the John A. Macdonald statue home to his "birth place"

    by Nugent Stuido Restoration Committee, 8 months ago

    TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

    We are a committee in the process of restoring the Provincially Designated Heritage Site, known as the JOHN NUGENT STUDIO. This lovely part of history is located in LUMSDEN, SASKATCHEWAN.

    We have been watching and listening carefully to the discussion surrounding the removal of the SIR JOHN A. MACDONALD STATUE. This piece of history is very important to us as we work respectfully and diligently to restore the legacy of Mr. Nugent. His contribution to the National and International Artistic community is invaluable. He received many commissions and awards.

    We, as family, friends and community... Continue reading

  • John A Macdonald was not even Prime Minister when Saskatchewan join Federation

    by hkk, 8 months ago

    Wilfrid Laurier was Prime Minister when Saskatchewan joined federation in 1905. You can argue he helped spur the railway across Canada but you have to acknowledge to build that railway they kicked off people from their lands, particularly in Saskatchewan.

  • Canada and its History

    by SS, 8 months ago
    It saddens me to see how our people have become complacent. We do have history and SJAM is part of that. If the City thinks the statue needs to be moved, perhaps the legislative grounds would be the best home. I don't think nasty plaques need to accompany it. SJAM did what he thought was best at that time in history. We must learn from our history and never forget it, because when you forget, is when it comes back to bite you! Therefore all our people no matter what color or religion needs to start working together for a... Continue reading
  • Being better than our past.

    by Dave Clampitt, 8 months ago
    Asking to take down the statue is not the same as burying our past or hiding our ancestors transgressions. We must learn to be and do better than those who came before us. To do that we must study our history to learn what was good and right, but also where those that came before made mistakes.


    Moving the John A. MacDonald statue from a park downtown does not indicate that we are denying our past. It shows that we've seen the mistakes made and are willing to accept them and acknowledge that we are capable of being better. There... Continue reading

Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30