John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Mixed Feelings

    by donnalit, 8 months ago
    As a non indigenous social studies teacher, I have spent the last several decades teaching and learning about Canada's history. Since the TRC I have become a lot more knowledgeable about all the issues, and I am glad for that. I consider myself an ally of indigenous people.


    I have learned the negative consequences for indigenous people of many of Macdonald's policies, and of decisions he made. Even his famous National Policy, about which I have head many, many student essays, was a disaster for indigenous people. There is no way of sugar coating his efforts to get indigenous people... Continue reading

  • Wither History?

    by OnceProudReginan, 8 months ago

    It is often said that history is written by the victors. There can be no more certain confirmation that it is but perception. It is not fact, nor will it ever be. Events happen but their interpretation shifts with time, temperament, personality, and politics. We were once certain that Macdonald was worthy of laud to the degree that we erected a statue. Now, that no longer seems appropriate.

    In the USA, their first president was a slaveowner and historians have fought over the paradox of a man who led a war of liberation would enslave and subject his "property" to... Continue reading

  • David Garneau

    by David Garneau, 8 months ago

    I moved to Regina 21 years ago from Alberta. In order to get a feel for the place, I walked. Beautiful place. But I was stunned to see a statue of John A Macdonald statue in the middle of the city. As a Métis man, I was puzzled why citizens here, in a city of few statues, chose to erect this one, to celebrate someone who had never even visited the place. Knowing that Louis Riel was hung in Regina, and played such a dramatic role in helping to shape this region, I was surprised to see Macdonald rather than... Continue reading

  • Suitable Place for Macdonald Statue

    by Hoping for Reconciliation, 8 months ago
    As already suggested on the grounds of the Legislature might be an appropriate place for this statue. Erasing / hiding parts of our history will not help us learn from mistakes made. We need to be able to move forward as a community and find compromises that respect all members of Regina (& our country, for that matter).
  • We can’t move forward without understanding the past

    by Vista131, 8 months ago
    We are all flawed individuals, and the wise among us no doubt wish they had made some choices in life differently. None of us are the people our dog thinks we are (we wish we were), and if our lives were put under the microscope, most would suffer deep embarrassment.

    The past can’t be changed. We can only attempt to understand it as best we can, given that we live in a very different cultural context.

    SJAM was a hugely important figure in Canadian political history, and it is ridiculous to think of placing any statues of him or most... Continue reading

  • Dictated to by 3% of the population

    by Winston1f, 8 months ago

    I, for one, consider the FIRST PRIME MINISTER'S pushing for the construction of the railway to British Columbia to be only one of his many accomplishments. He was a uniting figure for a country that very nearly became an American state. Any statue of him should be honoured and NOT stuffed into storage so someone will "feel safe to go downtown." I suggest it be moved to the Legislative grounds, near the stature of Queen Elizabeth II.



  • Let's do Better

    by SK, 8 months ago
    Hiding away history does not change the history. If we are wanting to have conversations of reconciliation is it not important to know the good, the bad, the ugly? Having the statue displayed is a good reminder that we can all grow, learn, and do better. Coming from an aboriginal background I do not see the need to remove the statue from its current location but it would be educational for visitors of the statue to have the full history displayed.
  • Just my opinion on this matter (as well as other cancel culture issues)

    by James Afseth, 8 months ago
    It is not our right to erase or hide history, no matter what!...ignorance of our history is far more dangerous than a monument that is offensive to a select few, and dooms us to repeat history.

    The good that Sir John A MacDonald did, should not be hidden from history...but neither should the his bad decisions.

    As a veteran of more than two decades of service to our country, both domestically and internationally, I've seen first hand how dangerous it is to erase or hide history...and I've seen the growing disrespect for our own war memorials, by people who have... Continue reading

  • Bizzare Method of Assessment

    by Allison, 8 months ago
    This is a bizzare way to publicly discuss this issue, as I have the impression that the type of audience that would typically post on a City of Regina page would be predominantly older and of European descent. And its showing up in the comments too, with a lot of "oops SJAM did a genocide but also Canada, and I value Canada more than indigenous people". It's not acceptable to give that opinion the same weight as those who say "SJAM's legacy and presence actively hurts me and mine". The lack of the statue downtown won't hurt anyone, and will... Continue reading
  • Sir John A and Tommy Douglas

    by schrjt, 8 months ago

    Within our woke society, if we are to remove Sir John A. Macdonald we must remove any edifice concerning Tommy Douglas.

    Tommy Douglas supported eugenics and traveled to Nazi Germany in 1936 seeking additional “socialistic” knowledge because he supported much of Hitler’s socialist policies. Douglas’s thesis, entitled The Problems of the Subnormal Family, embraced eugenics along with forced sterilization and segregation for people of “sub-normal” intelligence and morality. Tommy Douglas proposed a system requiring couples seeking to marry to be certified as mentally and morally fit. Those deemed “subnormal” because of low intelligence, moral laxity or venereal disease would surrender... Continue reading

Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30