John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Social Justice and Reconciliation

    by Clara, 8 months ago
    Canada has a shameful history of oppressing Indigenous peoples. The Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission provides an excellent overview of our true history and recommendations toward reconciliation. In some ways "racism" is so easy for people ("settlers" ) from the non-marginalized population of our society. It is past time for us to honor the Treaties that our ancestors co-signed! Macdonald, Dewdney and many others were people of "their time", yes, but their policies were informed by colonial, racist values..... which are beyond unacceptable today. I am excited about removing from our central gathering places and street and park... Continue reading
  • Tell the Whole Story

    by The Full Story, 8 months ago
    I would like to see MacDonald’s statue on display with other statues of people who played a role in Canada and Saskatchewan’s history, including leaders in First Nations Communities before, during and after the days of white settlement.

    I would also like to see information on display telling our factual history from all sides. There are many groups of people who lived in Canada or came to Canada. They all have important histories to recognize. Along with this, I would like there to be reference to places where more information is available.
    A place for this display could be in... Continue reading

  • Upset native born of canada

    by Upset native born of Canada, 8 months ago
    I cannot believe we have come to this ... it is not right to hide the statue... our founding father was only human... he did in my opinion much good as well ... we who were not alive at that time are still being punished for something we had no part of... I feel it’s time to let things go and live in harmony. But this will never happen when we r constantly paying and bending over for things in past we had no part of ... u can’t erase history. Let’s learn from it and go forward not backwards... Continue reading
  • Shame on the City for this action

    by Angry old lady, 8 months ago
    We all seem to be into cancel culture today which, while easy to do, will ultimately be harmful. I cannot believe that the city is contemplating removing this statue - OUR FIRST PM!!! We have NO city museum to showcase our heritage, but rely on national institutions to do so (Mackenzie Art Gallery, RCMP Heritage Museum) and a provincial natural history museum. We have little in the way of a city heritage (in spite of saving a few buildings), so sure let's remove statues, makes a huge amount of sense! My big complaint is that history taught in our K-12... Continue reading
  • More harm than good

    by Neato, 8 months ago

    Keeping the Macdonald statue in Victoria Park alienates the people that were hurt most by his policies. If the city of Regina claims to care about and respect the Indigenous people in the community, then it makes sense to remove the statue from its place of intended celebration and put it somewhere else. Personally, I think the RCMP heritage centre would be a great fit, and people can take the time there to learn about the good AND bad that the man did in his time, as well as the good and bad things the RCMP have done. Win-win.

    This... Continue reading

  • Move it to a museum

    by LJ in SK, 8 months ago

    Whether we acknowledge it or not, a statue in a prominent public place honours the person, what they have done, and what they represent. It's a symbol of pride in this person.

    I for one, do not want to honour this man. We can all agree that he had a significant role in forming this country and also in significantly damaging the lives of its Indigenous peoples for generations. It's a complicated legacy and history which cannot be properly addressed with a plaque at the bottom of a statue.

    In school, most of us were not taught the harmful things... Continue reading

  • What if ?

    by Escape , 8 months ago
    What if we cancel everything about a person that has had a negative impact on civilization? Regardless of how much good or bad they have contributed. One day in the not so distant future all our lives will be on display for the whole world to see. e.g. every comment you’ve ever made on any website or app, your search history, recording of what you’ve said in the privacy of your own home, jokes and conversations you’ve had in private while your cellphone is active, the kind of music you listen to that may or not degrade a race or... Continue reading
  • An Agenda

    by Rodney Littlecrow, 8 months ago

    This country has a history and we cannot just try and forget it. Taking down this statue is a statement but not what we are meant to think. As a native person I understand racism, but there are much more important things to work on. Let this statue stay where it is but let us understand more clearly what the first Prime Minister did. Good and bad. We are just letting an American social movement take over our country, letting them control our future.


    The removal of this statue is not for Canadian Native people to feel empowered, I surely... Continue reading

  • History

    by Commonsense , 8 months ago
    Without history you have no past. People, like societies, culture, civilizations grow. This growth can be for good and bad. Each individual, or above entity, can grow good and bad traits, and conditions. You are better off to celebrate successes and learn from mistakes, then to just erase the whole entity. There is no perfect modern person, just as there were no perfect people in the past. Stop the insanity of cancel culture. Learn from past mistakes.
  • Learn Vicariously

    by ProudlyCanadian?, 8 months ago

    We can learn tremendous values and lessons from those who have tread before us. It’s very easy to say, “that’s not what I would have done.” Prove it and leave your mark on today so you can best shape tomorrow without sacrificing yesterday. Protect and teach history so we know why we are great today. What can we achieve tomorrow?

    L

Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30