John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Another chapter in the continuing reconcilliation shakedown

    by Sir John A, 8 months ago
    The removal of the statue changes nothing but the usual grievance collectors will soldier on. Next stop is Dewdney Avenue.


    As a requirement of my employment I attended a seminar on residential schools & reconcilliation. An Elder told us that the Cree understanding of reconcilliation is as follows: one party offends or harms another. The offending party apologizes and makes amends then the offended party accepts the apology and the matter is concluded.


    The Federal government has apologized & over $3 billion has been paid out, Instead of moving on the usual suspects continue with their ongoing & seemingly never... Continue reading
  • All should be heard ..

    by TGFC, 8 months ago

    The Indian residential school system had its origins in laws enacted BEFORE Confederation in 1867, but it was primarily active from the passage of the Indian Act in 1876. In 1876, the Prime Minister was Alexander MacKenzie NOT J.A. MacDonald ! An AMENDMENT to the INDIAN ACT IN 1894, made attendance at day schools, industrial schools, or residential school COMPULSORY for First Nations children. Sir John A. McDonald DIED in 1891, years before this amendment !!

    It would be more accurate to vilify several generations of Canadian politicians from that era. However, at what generation should we stop ? This... Continue reading

  • Reconciliation, Not Revenge

    by Lyle H, 8 months ago

    There are few topics that make me angrier than attacks on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. I find it preposterous that, in this great country of ours, we are not allowed to be proud of our country or celebrate its founder.

    But this debate does not need any more irrational emotion, from me or anyone else. It needs facts and reason, even though I know such things are out of fashion in the social media age.

    Let's start with what is easily the most important fact: Indigenous people have suffered profound injustices at the hands of Canadians. But... Continue reading

  • cart before the horse

    by DeElina, 8 months ago
    I question why city council removed the J.A.Macdonld statue from the park before asking for input from anyone except one segment of Regina's population. This change involves everyone, not just the FN community. MacDonald wasn't perfect but who among us is? He did a lot to build Canada so why are we concentrating on only one of his actions? The statue could have stayed in the park with an information placard listing all his accomplishments...good and bad. Changing names of buildings, parks,rec centers and streets or removing statues will do nothing to change history. It is important to learn from... Continue reading
  • Loss of a Statue is Not a Loss of History

    by ACN, 8 months ago

    I had absolutely no feelings whatsoever about this statue until I heard the protests about it. I then did as much reading as I could about Mr. MacDonald and realized he was a pretty terrible person in general. I don’t see any issue with taking down a statue of a man who hurt so many people and putting it in a museum, especially since he was instrumental in oppressing not only Native Americans living here, but also Chinese immigrants who basically built our country through the railroads.

    To the people who are mad about it, I would ask to you... Continue reading

  • An actual survey should be done ..

    by TGFC, 8 months ago

    City of Regina should conduct an actual online survey about Victoria Park and the J.A. Macdonald statue. Instead, Regina city council makes a controversial decision and then runs around looking for input. Actually just looking for cover for an unpopular decision. An online survey would allow ALL interested voices to be heard, thereby respecting all residents equally. Thank you.


  • Alcoholic

    by b7michael, 8 months ago

    JAM would drink vodka while he was in the House of Commons because it would look like water in his glass. This is documented. He was a alcoholic that designed and implemented a plan to use federal law and government resources to starve and displace the First Nations from the land to allow settlement by the settlers. That must be included as part of his history.


    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/everyone-knows-john-a-macdonald-was-a-bit-of-a-drunk-but-its-largely-forgotten-how-hard-he-hit-the-bottle

  • A Statue as a Historical Teaching Tool

    by Shane Kleisinger, 8 months ago

    Some folks are very concerned about history. Therefore, the statue should be placed under the charge of the First Nations University of Canada history department to be used as a teaching tool as they see fit.

  • A Step In the Right Direction

    by JustAResident, 8 months ago

    To everyone complaining about the statue’s removal: did you even notice or care about this statue before? Or do you just suddenly care now? Most life-long residents of Regina I know, like myself, have never paid much attention to the statue. Taking it down harms no one, but leaving it up means we view him as a celebratory figure, which is deeply harmful to our Indigenous community. Taking it down is a step in the right direction to healing the racism and inequality in this country. If you really care about history, then you should care about teaching people the... Continue reading

  • Messing with Canada history

    by cheaper, 8 months ago
    I would like to complain about your decision to remove McDonald statue. Could you not just put up a plaque stating what he said. I did not realize he had said it. Give ALL people the chance to decide if they want to look at it. HAVE THE COUNCIL OR ANYBODY WHO COMPLAINED ABOUT IT NEVER MADE A MISTAKE. I believe I am having a good day if I make less than 10 mistakes A DAY. Think about it.
Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30