John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Let the truth be told................however shameful.........

    by Lord Redi, 6 months ago

    True nation building requires us to learn the true history of Canada and all it's peoples. Failure to do this continues to perpetuate a fractured Canadian identity laced with hurt on one side and racism on the other - a weaker Canada in a dangerous world. Patriotism requires all of us to face the moments of shame and the moments of pride in our collective history as one people to build a strong country each one of us is ready to die for.............let's take action to heal the hurt and harm done to our brothers and sisters, learn the true... Continue reading

  • We don't need to idolize murderers

    by Solidarity forever, 6 months ago
    No matter what good he did we have to come to terms with the extreme harm he brought to the indigenous population. He is directly responsible for acts of genocide enacted upon first nations. Theres no need for us to idolize a statue of him and be in denial of history. If it goes into a museum that's fine but not in public. Victoria Park is for EVERYONE, not just white people.
  • History belongs in museums and books but not in statues

    by VJV, 6 months ago
    JA Macdonald statue was rightfully removed, and it should be placed in a museum for education purposes. A standalone statue does nothing but glorify an individual and doesn't present the complicated history behind them.


    Hitler did a lot of great for Germany too - but we'd be aghast to go to Germany today and see a statue of him smack in the middle of Berlin.

    Let's call a spade a spade and ensure the entire story behind our country's founding father is told - and that doesn't happen as a random statue in the middle of the city.


  • The New Iconoclasts

    by The Thinker, 7 months ago

    In short, the Sir John A. McDonald statue should not have been removed.

    It should be placed back in its original spot, spruced up and highlighted as a great piece of our shared Canadian heritage. Every politician has policies with which at least some people disagree. This does not mean we should remove, destroy, or erase that history. The legacy of founding a country is the shared essence of who we are as citizens. To remove it is to essentially say that we are ashamed of those who formed a magnificent country. This is strange as many millions of people... Continue reading

  • MacDonald both hurt and helped, lets look at both sides.

    by MisterD, 7 months ago

    I believe the statue should be in Victoria park with an explanation of how he both hurt and helped all of us. His accomplishments were many and you can easily condemn his dark side but consider the alternative. Without his accomplishments there would be no Canada today and the Indian peoples would have suffered far worse under the US. Below is a column by Richard Gwyn that summarizes MacDonalds time as Prime Minister far better than I can.

    Among our 23 prime ministers, the first and most important was Sir John A. Macdonald.

    Had there been no Macdonald, it’s... Continue reading

  • We are way overdue...

    by Lee Stubbe, 7 months ago
    .... In this city, for an initiative aimed at educating white settlers (like me) in Regina about indigenous issues, past and present.


    It makes me sick to see some of the posts here. It's not surprising, though -- I've heard the same and worse from people's mouths. "It's not MY fault they're doing drugs!" "We gave them civilization and roads -- we brought them into the 20th century!" "I shouldn't be blamed for what my ancestors did."

    We need EMPATHY and LISTENING. We need those YESTERDAY. It's WELL past time for us to shut the **** up, sit down, and... Continue reading

  • Face Your History...

    by Okimakahn George Lepine , 7 months ago

    One of the most vivid quotes (and goals) he indicated in parliament was to "do away with the tribal system and assimilate the Indian people in all respects"... He was also known to strong hold very convictions against the Metis where he even compared Riel to that of a Dog when he was hung. He openly stated that the NWMP (pre RCMP) that they "were not ambassadors of goodwill or uniformed men sent to protect Indians; they were the colonizer's occupational forces and hence the oppressors of Indians and Métis." We all can go one and on with the... Continue reading

  • Canada would not exist without Macdonald

    by MJM, 8 months ago
    History is taught so poorly in our k-12 system it is no wonder that ideas such as this get started.


    Without Macdonald, Canada would be reduced to Upper Canada (southern Ontario), Lower Canada (southern Quebec) and maybe NB, NS and PEI. Western Canada would be part of the US - there would be NO Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and BC. The northern territories and northern Ontario and Quebec would have been US territories. Newfoundland would probably be still a separate country. Without the national railroad, the NWMP and settlements (including indigenous people), which are all tied up together to tell the... Continue reading

  • When do taxpayers get a vote on changes?

    by DeElina, 8 months ago

    I would venture to say that more than 90% of FN people have no idea who JAMacdonald even is or that he was our first prime minister. As usual the loudest demands by a few get whatever they want. No matter what the majority of taxpayers want. Another prime example of our city council’s decisions... because 600 people signed a petition to change the name of Dewdney Park, council changed it. That’s 600 out of a city population of 216,000. When will it end. For some reason politicians these days are unable to use good old common sense. It’s time... Continue reading

  • Teach and Build

    by ss, 8 months ago

    My comments are two-fold, and I think they go hand-in-hand.

    Growing up as an Indigenous girl, I remember thinking I was ugly. None of the people on the television looked like me - most celebrities were fair skinned with blonde hair. I was taught this was what beautiful was. I remember thinking, "I am so grateful my skin is not dark," and that is such a terrible thing to think about. As I grew older I was able to understand the oppression and stereotypes that were forced upon myself, my family, my Indigenous community. I realized if we just changed... Continue reading

Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30