John A. Macdonald Legacy Review

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

As a community, we learn through the diverse experiences and perspectives that are our shared history.


The City of Regina invites you to join a community conversation on the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald. The intent is to foster understanding and telling a complete story of Macdonald’s legacy, both his contributions to Canada as prime minister and founder of Confederation as well as the harmful impact his policies have had on Indigenous peoples and other ethno-cultural communities.

These conversations follow City Council’s decision on March 31, 2021 to relocate the Macdonald statue from Victoria Park. The statue will be moved into storage during this period of continued public consultation.

Since initiating a legacy review of the statue in June 2020, City staff have met with First Nations and Métis Knowledge Keepers, as well as Indigenous artists, curators and academics to seek guidance on how the statue can support a more complete story of the impact of Macdonald’s policies upon First Nations and Métis peoples and other ethno-cultural communities. .

While many historical texts document the negative impact of the Macdonald government’s policies on Indigenous and other ethno-cultural communities, many participants shared how these policies are still impacting them and their families today. For some, the statue is a regular reminder of colonial policies that relocated and restricted the movement of Indigenous Peoples, left their ancestors weaker and more prone to disease, and created residential and day schools.

Telling the full story is an important part of the City’s responsibilities as an institution engaged in Truth and Reconciliation. Moving forward, the City is considering programming and other resources to support increased understanding of Macdonald’s legacy.

We invite residents impacted by Macdonald’s legacy to use this online community to share their stories and the stories of their families. Through this, we hope to relearn a more inclusive history the experiences of Regina’s people.

Share your story

What’s your story? We are especially interested to hear the stories that are unique to you and your experience. If you don’t have a story, you can also share your thoughts and ideas about local history and other issues or ideas that might be worth exploring. You can also upload photos, videos and insert links. 

We want this to be a safe space for everyone to share thoughts, feelings and opinions. Words are powerful, so please make sure yours are respectful to all. By sharing, you are helping to foster a community conversation that can give us all a better understanding of our collective history.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
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  • Do not glorify genocide

    by Anthony, 8 months ago

    Statues in public places are meant to glorify persons, not to acknowledge history. If such person's ideas and acts cause so much resentment in a significant part of a society (like this case), it should be kept in a museum or history books only. Keeping this statue it will only cause more social division and resentment.

  • Living in the past!

    by Dotty, 8 months ago

    We all make mistakes,we are human; I believe SJ did what he thought was right at that time in Canada. I believe it is unhealthy to live in the past . Removing a statue does nothing to change the past. We all need to move forward collectively, no matter what colour you are. We all need to become respectful of one another and this starts at home!

  • We can not rewrite history

    by Trex, 8 months ago
    History is full of both good and bad decisions but that does not mean that we can alter those decisions from long ago. He was our first prime minister and because of him and his colleagues visions, we are living in the best country in the world. He had his flaws but then again, we all do! Please don’t mothball is great statue which represents what we have become, we have learned from past mistakes but that does not give us the right to obliterate or past.
  • Education, not vilification

    by Bob R, 8 months ago

    Rather than laying the blame for the damage to Indigenous peoples solely on individuals such as MacDonald, Dewdney and Davin, due to them being evil, it would be better to provide information on what were the commonly held views of the times that caused so much damage. For instance, from my reading of the historical section of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, it appears Davin had good intentions when he recommended setting up boarding schools. It was ignorance on his part, and societies', rather than bad intentions, along with government underfunding, that led to such a... Continue reading

  • Leave it for both !!

    by A Proud Canadian !!, 8 months ago
    Leave the statue as it is so that people who believed in him , can share his legacy with their upcoming generations and people who think he was a dark mark on canada’s great history can make their future generations learn about the past.

    You can remove his statue from the park but not from the history of Canada. I am from India and every year we celebrate Diwali in which we remember both the good and the evil , good inspires us to do better and bad motivates us to be kind to everyone otherwise you will also be... Continue reading

  • turf it

    by Silas Dogood, 8 months ago

    I am not Indigenous he never set foot in the city and his National Policy basically left us with a resource extraction dependent economy we still can not get out from under 150 years latter , he was also an alcoholic who criminalized abortion and homosexuality . He imposed the chines head tax and also did not want chines immigrants to be able to vote .
    we should have statues of people who at least set foot in Regina on Regina public lands !

  • Education needed, not forgettinging MacDonald

    by Bob R, 8 months ago

    Rather than removing the statue so that we can forget about Macdonald, a better solution would be to provide information regarding the good and the bad he did.

    MacDonald represented the racist views of his times, and he was not particularly bad. When his government was providing assistance to set up farming on reserves, the Saskatchewan Herald said assistance to help natives take up farming was “conducive to the destruction of self-reliance, and calculated to give them a false impression of what the Government owed them.” A Liberal MP said government aid went against “natural law” which said Indians were... Continue reading

  • Is John A McDonald just another bogus reconciliation scam?

    by Orville, 8 months ago
    Where is the common sense in this “hiding the statue”? When Andrew Scheer spoke that day, there were 12 protestors out throwing “F” bombs at him being very offensive. The other 235,000 Regina people were at work or being productive in some other manner.


    where were the ladies who wrote in the United Church Observer saying”thank goodness for residential schools where we were “warm, clean and well fed and schooled”, wonderful compared to where we had been.

    Afriend of mine’s father was an educator years back said the provincial government was advised by people from the U.S. not to build... Continue reading

  • Madonald's Policies Have Resulted in Great Harm for All of Canada

    by Bill, 8 months ago

    Canadians are becoming increasingly aware of Macdonald's crimes against Indigenous peoples and of the ongoing suffering those crimes have caused, which is reason enough to remove his statue from public places.

    But it needs to be said that his legacy has also shamed and diminished Canada as a whole. We are seen by the rest of the world as a country that is guilty of cultural genocide and attempted physical genocide.

    Also, we are are infected as a nation by systemic racism, ongoing division, and the loss of the important gifts that Indigenous people would have shared with the rest... Continue reading

  • Keep Sir John A MacDonald

    by Ken, 8 months ago
    He is a big part of our history.

    The activists like to have their photo's taken with him.

    Not all bad things happened.

    Around 150 thousand childern came through the system. And I have to think most have a better life for that. If they chose to do so.

    We have talked to a lady that worked at one of the schools, and she said they were fed and clothed very well.

Page last updated: 04 October 2021, 09:30